Cultural & Language Reclamation

  • Ka Lamakū La’akea

    Ka Lamakū La’akea

    Ka Lamakū La’akea, the sacred light within, or the torch of the sacred light. Their mission is to bring light to the world, to elevate and to expand human consciousness through healing, prayer, and ceremony, through perpetuation & practice of ‘ōlelo Hawai’i and Hawaiian culture, by fostering spiritual wayfinding and awareness. Ka Lamakū La’akea hopes…

  • Language Acquisition & Immersion for the New Generation (LAING)

    Language Acquisition & Immersion for the New Generation (LAING)

    Language Acquisition & Immersion for the New Generation (LAING)’s mission is to perpetuate, promote, preserve, and introduce the various heritage languages and cultures of the immigrant population of Hawai’i and the United States, and to use them as vehicles for community empowerment, heritage education, social services, and language and cultural access. Starting with the many…

  • ‘Āina Aloha Economic Futures

    ‘Āina Aloha Economic Futures

    ‘Āina Aloha Economic Futures is a coalition of organizations and individuals who are collaborating to produce a vision for Hawai’i’s future that is established on a core set of values that are grounded in and embrace our unique island identity, culture, and resources. The hui calibrates a course not only to recovery but rediscovery of…

  • Ke Kula Nui o Waimānalo

    Ke Kula Nui o Waimānalo

    Ke Kula Nui O Waimānalo (KKNOW) is a grassroots community-based organization established in 2017 by individuals from diverse backgrounds all hailing from the Waimānalo ahupua’a. The organization’s vision, Kūkulu Kaiāulu (building community), aims to help Waimānalo become self-sustainable in every way, from the mountain to the sea. They activate their vision through free, culturally-grounded and…

  • Pu’uhonua o Wailupe

    Pu’uhonua o Wailupe

    Pu’uhonua o Wailupe is a living sanctuary for the stewardship and protection of iwi kūpuna, cultural sites, natural resources, and traditional Hawaiian rights and practices. Located in a predominantly settler community on East O’ahu, they aim to protect the unique history, cultural sites, and iwi kūpuna of Wailupe. The hui engages in educational outreach, non-violent…

  • Lā Ho’iho’i Ea Honolulu

    Lā Ho’iho’i Ea Honolulu

    Lā Ho’iho’i Ea Honolulu‘s mission is to uphold a “big tent” for the Hawaiian independence movement. They provide safe and inclusive spaces to celebrate, learn about, and strengthen the political autonomy of Hawai’i’s people, past, present, and future. Through the perpetuation of Lā Ho’iho’i Ea (Hawaiian sovereignty restoration day), they bring people together in educational,…

  • Keli’i William Ioane Legacy Foundation

    Keli’i William Ioane Legacy Foundation

    The Keli’i William Ioane Legacy Foundation was created to honor and perpetuate the legacy of Keli’i “Skippy” Ioane, and encompasses the work of the Mālama Ka ‘Āina Hana Ka ‘Āina Association (M.A.H.A), the Keaukaha Makahiki Ceremony, and the promotion of Hawaiian Nationalism through his music. In 1980 Keli’i arrived on Kaho’olawe and was trained by…

  • Hui Ho’oleimaluō

    Hui Ho’oleimaluō

    Hui Hoʻoleimaluō envisions thriving communities through thriving resources. Established in 2013 in Keaukaha, Hawaiʻi, the hui has spent the past seven years conducting long-term historical, cultural, physical, natural, and scientific studies of fishponds in Keaukaha, including Honokea Loko, Waiuli, and most recently at Kaumaui Loko. Their loving restoration and revitalization of the two sites has grown into…

  • Hui Iwi Kuamo’o

    Hui Iwi Kuamo’o

    For 33 years, Hui Iwi Kuamo’o has provided care for iwi kūpuna (ancestral Hawaiian bones), moepū (funerary possessions) and mea kapu (sacred objects) through repatriation and reburial. Founded as Hui Mālama i Nā Kūpuna ‘0 Hawai’i Nei (Hui Mālama), Hui Iwi Kuamo’o continues this kuleana (duties and responsibilities to care for the ancestors) as volunteers.…

  • Nā Moku Aupuni o Ko’olau Hui

    Nā Moku Aupuni o Ko’olau Hui

    Nā Moku Aupuni o Koʻolau Hui perpetuates the Kanaka Maoli traditional and customary lifestyle of Keʻanae-Wailuanui. Encompassing nearly 400 acres of loʻi, it was renowned for taro farming until commercial stream diversions completely dewatered the area. In 2018, the community’s 30-year legal struggle resulted in the largest stream restoration in Hawaiʻiʻs history. In March, 2022 and…